Nanomaterials and Thin Films for light emitting and photovoltaic Applications

The investigation of materials for solid-state lighting has a fundamental role in the development of cost-effective and environmentally friendly light sources. Short wavelength emitting materials are highly interesting candidates for their potential use in the energy efficient solid state lighting. This activity is directed towards the study of the growth and characterisation of the highly luminescent doped nanocrystals of cuprous halide materials. The emission properties of the materials are investigated using photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence studies.

The goal is to design efficient blue/UV light emitting devices as well as window layers for the photovoltaic cell. We are successfully developed and optimized the deposition processes based on the pulsed dc magnetron sputtering and thermal evaporation techniques.

Magnetron sputtering system used for the nanocrystal fabrication
Magnetron sputtering system used for the nanocrystal fabrication.

Inorganic nanocrystal materials prepared using sputtering methods
Inorganic nanocrystal materials prepared using sputtering methods


We have investigated and optimized the deposition process of the cuprous oxide nanocrystals which appear as a promising candidate for solar cell applications. We have designed a process to reduce the resistivity of this non toxic highly abundant material, which is expected to be one of the reasons for the lower efficiency of the cuprous oxide based solar cells. Currently looking at the photoresponse properties of the devices fabricated using different inorganic nanocrystals, and thin film heterojunctions.